Collections Management @ Bodleian Libraries Book Storage Facility

On Thursday 30th March, Michael Williams and his team opened the doors of the Bodleian Libraries Book Storage Facility in Swindon, having given members of the Collection Management community a rare opportunity to visit.  Anne Worden, who visited from the University of Portsmouth, kindly agreed to us posting her report on our blog:

Visit to Bodleian Libraries Book Storage Facility, Swindon, 30/3/17

Oxford opened this facility in October 2010 as a replacement for multiple other stores, including a salt mine in Cheshire, which were becoming very expensive. It is in one corner of a 17 acre site which the university bought and they will be expanding the current warehouse over the next 4 years at the same time as building a store for the Oxford University museums.

The current capacity is 13 million items with 8.9m being stored, so about three quarters full. They “ingest” (accession) about 7,000 new items per week, making just under 400,000 each year. The conditions meet BS5454 and PD5454, with the temperature being 17.5°C (+ or – 1°C) and the humidity 52% (+ or – 5) – 15,000 sprinkler heads are in place in case of fire. Items are stored in acid free, archival quality, strong cardboard box trays.

Stock is stored on 11m high, German-engineered (no leaning forward!!), metal shelves which are 70m long with 31 narrow aisles between them. Three aisles contain a huge run of map cabinets spread over 5 floors. All other items are stored by size and most have a barcode stuck on the top left hand corner to aid quick retrieval – those that don’t have the barcode stuck onto them have the barcode on a slip of paper sticking out the top but this isn’t ideal as the barcodes get mixed up when people borrow several items like this at the same time. Six forklift trucks are used to enable 8 retrievals of stock a day between 7am and 10pm, Monday to Friday – seeing the pod of the forklift rise up 10m to get something then move forward at that height to the next retrieval was quite a sight!

They get approximately 19,500 requests each month, a figure which has increased year on year. They think the increase is due to the speed and reliability of the service – vans deliver to libraries around Oxford twice a day and if you order by 10.30am in the morning, you can have the book the same day. Unexpectedly, medium use stock has been stored there as well as low use stock, as librarians have discovered that putting copies into the store actually makes them more accessible to users in different libraries around Oxford because of the frequent delivery service.

In addition to the delivery service, they also provide a scanning service and scan about 50-60 items per week in term. The reader gets a link to a server and then has 2 weeks to access the article/chapter. The scan stays on their system for a term just in case of retrieval problems, then gets deleted. They have just dropped the price of scans from £4 to £2 in order to encourage more use of this service.

There are 22 staff working in shifts and the key contact is Michael Williams, Head of Storage and Logistics. Because they will have spare capacity for the foreseeable future, they are keen to encourage other universities to use the facility – Cambridge are currently storing their newer legal deposit collection there whilst they wait for their own store to be built. Stock for other institutions is stored on separate aisles so can’t get mixed up with the Oxford stock. Michael said that he is happy to provide price estimates based on exact requirements.

Jenny Yaacob and I came away extremely impressed by the scale and efficiency of the whole set-up. If we were to consider off-site storage for legacy items, I would certainly recommend investigating what they could offer us, as nothing we could do ourselves would match their skilled operation.

AW 31/3/17

 

Manchester Event Presentations

We held another ‘Introduction to CCM Tools’ event in Manchester on 15th November. Thanks to the Library at the University of Manchester for hosting us.

We were again very fortunate to have some fascinating presentations from colleagues about their use of CCM Tools and the speakers have kindly agreed to make their slides available, or to to write them up as case studies in new year.

Artists Books Benchmarking Using CCM Tools: Jane Daniels, Cardiff Metropolitan University.

CCM Tools at the University of Hull: Dawn Holland will be contributing a case study covering her ‘user story’ in the new year.

Collection development & profiling: Andrew Paton, University of Manchester Library.

Thanks once again to our speakers and our lively participants who contributed to an engaging and enlightening session.

Introductory events held in July

The CCM Tools team recently ran two ‘Introduction to CCM Tools’ events: the first hosted by the University of Nottingham and the second by SOAS, University of London.  Both events were well attended and provided those new to CCM Tools with an overview of different use cases for the Tools with supporting case studies.  This was followed by some user stories from colleagues who spoke about their early experiences using the Tools in their institutions.

Our thanks go to Amy Seal, Sarah Davies, Chloe Barnes and Paul Wearing for speaking at the events: these contributions from practitioners really help to bring the value of the Tools to life for participants. The speakers have kindly agreed to make their slides available below:

Amy Seal, University of Leicester

Paul Wearing, Cardiff Metropolitan University

Chloe Barnes, University of Sussex

Sarah Davies, University of Nottingham

Following the presentations (and tea and biscuits) there was an opportunity for participants to get practical with a hands-on exercise providing an introduction to the Tools.  Unfortunately technical problems at SOAS made this difficult at the second event, but everyone took the exercise away to use back at the office.  It’s also available here for anyone to use.

Another event has been scheduled at the University of Manchester on 15th November. Bookings will be opening on the lis-collection-mgmt email list shortly.

CCM Tools Community Events July 2014

Following on from last summer’s successful CCM Introductory Events, we ran two more community events in Manchester and London this July.  The purpose of the events was to give both new and more experienced CCM users an opportunity to share experience, discuss the broader national context in which the Tools operate and to engage in the ongoing development of the Tools as we move into a new phase of development.

Each event began with a series of case studies from users covering a broad range of experience from getting started to complex ongoing evaluation work.  Each of the presenters has kindly agreed to us making their slides available below:

Helen Faulds, University of St Andrews

Jane Podmore, University of Manchester

Gary Ward, University of Sheffield

Ruth Elder, University of York

Melanie Wood, University of Newcastle

Laura Macpherson, University of Edinburgh

Jennifer Prada, presenting on behalf of David Clover, Senate House Library

Following on from this, Ben Showers from Jisc spoke about the National Monographs Strategy: identifying CCM as a vital piece of the strategic jigsaw in this broader context.  The Strategy looks at developing a national approach to the lifecycle of monographs, and Ben provided an update on the background, methodology, ideas and next steps for this area of work.

A stimulating group discussion followed this, looking at the broader questions identified in Ben’s session, specifically how we can develop a ‘trust infrastructure’ to ensure that institutions can  trust the Tools and each other to work towards enabling robust national agreements and policies for monographs.

After lunch Shirley Cousins, Copac Service Manager gave an update on the new Copac database and how the enhancements will impact on CCM Tools, including a glimpse of the new Copac user interface which was warmly welcomed!

This was followed by a chance for hands-on use of the Tools, either with an CCM-intro-handson-0714 for new users or an opportunity to look into CCM-dedup-hands-on-0714 in more depth.  Delegates also contributed to a focus group, and were asked to contribute their comments, feedback and suggestions on how we can improve the CCM Tools.  We also asked for their ideas for enhanced support features which would help users to get started with using the Tools and continue to support ongoing use to enable them to become embedded in institutional workflows.  The CCM team found the content of these discussions invaluable to inform our future plans.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to and participated in the events, for engaging so positively in all the sessions.  We hope by keeping in touch with each other, delegates will become part of a supportive community of CCM Tools users as they go from strength to strength.

 

CCM Beta Trial Introductory Events

We recently held events in Manchester and London for members of RLUK to introduce the CCM tools Beta interface and provide some context to those trialling the interface. These included real world case studies, as well as an opportunity for hands on experimentation.

The presentations generated wide ranging discussion about the national context for the CCM tools as well as potential applications. Ideas were flowing as delegates started working with the tools and thinking about how they might be applied within their own local context, with excitement about the opportunities beyond the obvious ones relating to making space on the shelves. This was also an opportunity for us to get initial feedback as delegates began to work with the facilities.

The main elements of the programme are given below; there are links to the presentations as well as background material; hands-on examples are now included on the CCM forum for RLUK members involved in the Beta trial.

The limited scope of current activity means the Beta trial is restricted to RLUK members only, but we will be looking at ways of broadening access as we gather feedback towards the end of the year.

CCM tools Beta Trial: Introductory Event Programme

The National Context

London: Dr. Mike Mertens, Deputy Executive Director and Data Services Manager, RLUK.
Manchester: Michael Emly, Head of Collection Services, University of Leeds Library.

This presentation provided the broader context within which the CCM tools are being used, looking at the changing national landscape as well as the changing role of RLUK.

CCM tools ‘The Bigger Picture’ Slides

Group discussion:

How local decisions can affect the wider national context for collection management. (See Leeds Case study extract).

Case Study 1: Sheffield University

Gary Ward, Head of Capacity Management, University of Sheffield Library.

Gary discussed the way the CCM Tools were used in an actual withdrawal of stock procedure at Sheffield during 2012. The CCM Tools were used to identify last copies amongst titles considered for withdrawal and to identify copies held in eight or more other libraries besides Sheffield, which were then considered candidates for withdrawal. This supported the withdrawal of over 1100 items, freeing significant shelf space, whilst taking into consideration the continued availability of materials for researchers. The presentation covers the background to the case study, the case study itself, the findings and finally some recent developments that have occurred since the case study.

University of Sheffield case study slides

Case Study 2: York University

Ruth Elder, Collection Space Management Co-ordinator, University of York Library.

Ruth addressed the way the CCM tools have been used to support “business as usual” practice at York in the context of creating a “Collection Profile.”  This pulls together a wide range of relevant information into one accessible location in a graphic manner, which can shared with those who it is most relevant to inform their decision making – such as subject librarians, senior library managers and academic departments. The presentation discusses the work flow involved. The Collection Profiles have received a positive reception at York and are now embedded as part of the 5 year Content strategy.  They are encouraging and facilitating discussions between the library and academic departments in regard to evaluating stock selection and use, contributing to more positive collaborative relationships.

University of York case study slides

A more detailed description of the Case Study is also available “Identifying titles for potential purchase using the Copac Collection Management tool

Copac Data: an introduction

Shirley Cousins, Copac Manager, Mimas, University of Manchester.

The way the Copac deduplication is carried out has some implications for the CCM search. This is summarised on the CCM forum for RLUK members. In addition, as a union catalogue Copac is dependent on updates from our contributing libraries, which in turn affects the currency of the picture you see within CCM. Update frequency varies from weekly or monthly for most large institutions, through to historic collections which are and largely unchanging so may only provide an annual refresh. You can check the currency of the data from any institution at:

http://copac.ac.uk/about/library-update/

This page also shows where a library has changed their library system and we are awaiting a reload, so the catalogue has not been updated as recently as would normally be the case.

Hands-on

The hands-on provided an opportunity to follow some structured exercises, plus time for unstructured experimentation. A hands-on worksheet is available to CCM users on the User forum.

Action Planning

There was an opportunity to prepare an Action Plan to take away. You can download a copy of the Action Plan Template for CCM tools.